Senator Sinema Took Wall St. Money, Then Killed a Tax on Investors.

When following American politics, always follow the money.

Lauren Elizabeth

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Photo via Andrew Harnik/AP Photo

Though the Democratic Party has been little more than a lackluster, thorough disappointment over the past two years, there’s no denying that Senator Kyrsten Sinema has been among the most enraging. Personally, watching her happily attempt to catch Mitch McConnell’s attention before gleefully standing in front of her colleagues, and making a show of a small curtsy as she voted no on a $15 minimum wage is something I will never forget. It was a moment of clarity, really. A slap in the face. A moment where it had never felt more obvious that when it comes to getting things done to benefit the American people overall, we cannot rely on elected politics alone if at all.

Well, given her track record it should come as no surprise that Senator Sinema recently took yet another opportunity with the Schumer-Manchin bill to be the lapdog for her real master: Wall St.

Brian Slodysko with the Associated Press writes:

“Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, the Arizona Democrat who single-handedly thwarted her party’s longtime goal of raising taxes on wealthy investors, received nearly $1 million over the past year from private equity professionals, hedge fund managers and venture capitalists whose taxes would have increased under the plan.

For years, Democrats have promised to raise taxes on such investors, who pay a significantly lower rate on their earnings than ordinary workers. But just as they closed in on that goal last week, Sinema forced a series of changes to her party’s $740 billion election-year spending package, eliminating a proposed “carried interest” tax increase on private equity earnings while securing a $35 billion exemption that will spare much of the industry from a separate tax increase other huge corporations now have to pay...”

God, our lawmakers are so cheap aren’t they? It really is the cherry on top, just how little it takes for them to be bought by the highest bidder. All it took was $1 million in campaign contributions from hedge fund managers, private equity professionals, and venture capitalists — some of the richest people in the country for Sinema to essentially guarantee them a tax

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Lauren Elizabeth

Lauren is a writer & leftist with analysis on topics related to politics & policy. She can be reached at LaurenMartinchek@gmail.com or Twitter @xlauren_mx